11 Mythical Creepy Creatures You Might Not Know about. #5 Would Make a Great Movie!

Beware of the Snow Woman's Embrace!

Beware of the Snow Woman's Embrace!

1. Snow Woman

In ancient Japan, people told stories of weary travelers walking alone on a cold winter's night far from any village who would run into a pale, beautiful woman, white as the snow. When the travelers came upon her, she would hold out her arms, inviting them in for a warm embrace. Few men could resist this, and as soon as they hugged the snow woman they were doomed to die for as soon as he hugged her she drained all of the life out of him. The traveler's frozen body would be found days later lying in the snow. 

Beware of the Acheri as she is the harbinger of illness and death.

Beware of the Acheri as she is the harbinger of illness and death.

2. Acheri

Known to many indigenous tribes in North America, Acheri lived on a mountain top and had the semblance of a thin, pale girl. In the night, Acheri would come down from the mountains to wail and dance and bring trouble and sorrow to people. Acheri was known as the spirit of sickness and death. Whenever children fell ill, parents knew it was because the Acheri's shadow had fallen on the child. In order to protect their children, mothers would tie red strings around their necks because Acheri would not harm people wearing red. 

Watch out for your children! The Bodach might come to get them. 

Watch out for your children! The Bodach might come to get them. 

3. Bodach 

In Scotland, parents would tell their children that if they didn't behave, the Bodach would come and snatch them out of their beds while they were sleeping. The Bodach is a small, shriveled old man who would climb down the chimney and steal naughty children out of their beds while they were sleeping. Any child taken by the Bodach would never be seen again. 

Don't want to get in the way of this guy. 

Don't want to get in the way of this guy. 

4. Manticore

The Manticore prowled the forests of Asia. It had the body of a lion, the tail of a snake and the head of a man. When you looked in it's mouth, you'd discover rows upon rows of teeth, like in a shark's mouth. At the end of the snake tail were several large spikes that each had a stinger with poisonous spikes. Just by a slight snap of it's tail, the Manticore could launch these spikes like a bullet for a distance of at least 100 feet. The Manticore also had stingers hidden in its hair. A wound from the Manticores stingers meant sudden death. The Manticore was a flesh eater and took great pleasure out of eating humans. 

Be careful if you hear the sounds of bones rattling in the night - the Bay-kok might be coming for you.

Be careful if you hear the sounds of bones rattling in the night - the Bay-kok might be coming for you.

5. Bay-kok

The Bay-kok is no ordinary hunter - he would hunt men. The Chippewa Tribe would tell stories of this skeleton like creature with red eyes and transparent skin. The Bay-kok carried all the trappings of a hunter - bow, arrow and club. Starting in the spring, the Bay-kok would come into the forests from the east and make a west ward journey until autumn, hunting men along the way. As he would walk, his bones rattled, and when hunters heard that sound in the forest, they knew the Bay-kok was passing and one of them might soon die. The Bay-kok would silently prey upon sleeping hunters, slit a small opening in their abdomen and remove a small part of their stomach and eat it. The bit was so small that it would go unnoticed, but before long, the hunter would waste away and die. 

Always make sure to have some cucumbers on hand if a Kappa is around. 

Always make sure to have some cucumbers on hand if a Kappa is around. 

6. Kappa

Kappas were evil river spirits in ancient Japan. They had the body and shell of a turtle, the head of a monkey and the legs of a frog. Kappas would walk upright like a human and were about the size of a young, teenage boy. The top of a kappa's head was hollow and always filled with water, which gave this spirit life. The kappas took delight in drowning children who went swimming in rivers. Japanese mother's knew that Kappas loved cucumbers, so they would often throw them into the water when their children went swimming so as to bribe the kappas into sparing their children's lives. 

Kappas were warlike creatures, and because of this warriors would sometimes seek them out and challenge them to a duel with the intention of ridding the countryside of these wicked creatures. Kappas were also polite and when the warrior would bow to it at the beginning of the duel, the kappa would bow back and the water in the top of it's head would run out, leaving the kappa immensely weakened and easy to slay.

Don't fall for this horse's tricks! It might just land you in a mud puddle. 

Don't fall for this horse's tricks! It might just land you in a mud puddle. 

7. Pooka

Native to Ireland, the pookas would lurk around mainly during twilight hours. They could take the form of a mule, horse, donkey, goat, bull or huge dog - coal black with red, glowing eyes. They would appear to milkmaids, farmers and lonely travelers. They loved playing pranks on people and would often run between people legs, and carry them off on their backs for a wild ride until they dumped them in a pond or puddle. Their pranks were generally no worse than that, but if a person was impolite to the pooka, they could become dangerous. One of pooka's favorite pranks was to visit blackberry brambles on Halloween night and mash all the berries flat. 

Always keeping an eye out for stray children.

Always keeping an eye out for stray children.

8. Black Annis

This blue skinned, one-eyed hag was native to Scotland. She would often spend her time sitting on a pile of bones outside of her cave - the remnants of her previous meals. Any poor soul who passed her might fall prey to her, although the Blue Annis was especially fond of lambs and stray children, which she would eagerly watch out for with her one eye.

Better have your quick quips and rhymes ready if you want your ship to pass through the Minch safely. 

Better have your quick quips and rhymes ready if you want your ship to pass through the Minch safely. 

9. Blue Men of the Minch

These men with blue skin lived in the waters of the Minch, a stretch of sea about 30 miles wide between the coast of West Scotland and one of the Hebrides Islands. Whenever they slept the weather was fine, but as soon as they awoke, the weather would turn stormy. If a ship ever passed through the Minch while the blue men were awake, they would swim over to the ship and try and sink it. If the captain of the ship was smart and witty, he could keep the ship safe from the blue men by calling out to them and challenging them to a duel of words, and as long as he always had the last word and everything he said rhymed, he ship would make it through the Minch safely. 

New mothers better watch out for these guys. 

New mothers better watch out for these guys. 

10. Al

These hairy, half-animal, half-human creatures were known and feared by the people of Armenia. The dwelled in damp and watery places, and at times they'd been known to reside in corners of stables. They had teeth of iron and nails of brass . They posed the greatest threat to expecting mothers as they delighted in causing children to be born blind or deformed. In order to protect herself, an expecting mother would have to keep an iron tool on her person at all times and surround herself with iron objects when she slept. Even if a baby was born safetly, Als might wait until the child was 7 months old and and then steal it and take it to the Al kindom to eat!

These amphibious creatures were native to Australia.

These amphibious creatures were native to Australia.

11. Bunyip

These mysterious and dangerous creatures lived in the waterholes, rivers and lakes in Australia.  Bunyips varied in appearance, but most were said to have a furry body of a dog, a doglike head and webbed feet. They were amphibious and could dwell on land and in water. Bunyips had a loud, terrible voice that could be heard for miles when they bellowed. At any chance they had, bunyips would pull people into the water and drown them. 

List compiled and adapted by Rajmani Sinclair from The Encyclopedia of Legendary Creatures by Tom McGowen